Items tagged Braceros (17 total)

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Having heard about successful braceros, Salvador Esparza Carreño decided to enlist in the bracero program in 1945. He worked as a railroad worker, in the fields cutting asparagus, and as a camp cook. He describes his work and leisure time in and around Chicago in a camp of about 150 bracero railroad workers repairing track. He recalls…

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Item Type: Oral History
Date: 2003

Aaron Castañeda Gamez and thousands of other Mexican workers had to pass a series of examinations to enter the bracero program. Recruits reported to centers in Mexico where they were inspected for lice and disease. Braceros' hands were inspected to see if they had calluses, indicating they were familiar with manual labor. They were told to…

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Item Type: Artifact
Date: 1944

Between 1942 and 1964, millions of Mexican agricultural workers entered the U.S. to work as surplus farm laborers during the government-sponsored Bracero Program. Working for lower wages than domestic farm workers, the Braceros were often victims of discrimination. While most were repatriated, many stayed in the United States where they remain the…

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Item Type: Artifact
Date: 1955

A brief overview of the Bracero program that allowed Mexican agricultural workers to enter the U.S. legally to work as farm laborers.

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Item Type: Article/Essay
Date: 2008

This handout describes the themes and formulas of corridos, Mexican and Mexican-American folk songs.

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Item Type: Article/Essay
Date: 2010

The majority of braceros who came to the United States performed the most difficult types of agricultural labor: planting, tending, and harvesting crops. This type of work was called "stoop work" because it required laborers to spend all day bent over. Even during the worst years of the Great Depression, growers had a hard time finding people…

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Item Type: Photograph
Date: 1943

The scale of the United States' war production effort during World War II touched every corner of the nation and millions of people. When traditional farm workers left for military service or higher paying jobs in war industries, the U.S. government looked south to Mexico. Several thousands braceros were invited to work in the United States,…

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Item Type: Photograph
Date: 1943