Modern America (1914-1929)
(62 total)

Sort By | Title | Date | Recently Added
This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary Up South: African-American Migration in the Era of the Great War. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary as well as additional primary source materials for use in the classroom.

Tags:
Item Type: Viewer's Guide
Date: 2007

This timeline tracks significant events in African American history between 1863 and 1960.

Tags:
Item Type: Timeline
Date: 1863

Restrictions on immigration, largely aimed at would-be migrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, gained considerable popular support during the 1920s. Anti-immigrant sentiment culminated in the Quota Act of 1921, which effectively reduced immigration from those areas to a quarter of pre-World War I levels, and in the even more restrictive…

Tags: ,
Item Type: Speech
Date: 1924

America's reputation as a land of welcome for immigrants has often been compromised by periodic calls to "shut the door" on immigration. At the turn of the twentieth century, the arrival of unprecedented numbers of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe led to growing public support for restrictive immigration laws. After a temporary slowing…

Tags: ,
Item Type: Speech
Date: 1924

Proponents of eugenics believed that various forms of "social inadequacy", including mental illness, criminality, and physical handicaps, were the result of inherited genetic traits. Some studies, such as this one from 1922, attempted to link these tendencies to specific nationalities and ethnic groups, including people of African and Asian descent…

Tags: , ,
Item Type: Quantitative Data
Date: Circa 1922

In the years after World War I, Congress passed the Quota Act of 1921, followed by the Immigration Act of 1924, also known as the Johnson-Reed Act. The 1924 Act established a quota for the total number of immigrants allowed per annum at 165,000— less than 20 percent of the pre-World War I average— and based ceilings on the numbers of…

Tags: ,
Item Type: Quantitative Data
Date: 2008

"True Sons of Freedom," by Charles Gustrine, is a poster depicting African-American soldiers fighting against the German army. Three hundred and fifty thousand African Americans participated in the segregated U.S. army during WWI, but they were often limited to being support troops. Many units found combat fighting alongside the French, and some…

Tags: , ,
Item Type: Poster/Print
Date: 1918

In the years after World War I, American workers sought to consolidate and expand the gains they had achieved during the war years. In September 1919, some 350,000 steelworkers went on strike, seeking higher wages, shorter hours and better working conditions. Steel companies, often with assistance of local governments, responded with violent…

Tags:
Item Type: Pamphlet/Petition
Date: 1919

In July 1919, Chicago suffered a terrible race riot. An African-American teenager swimming in Lake Michigan floated into a "white" area and drowned after being stoned by a white crowd. Violence spread rapidly. Black Chicagoans, including World War I veterans, fought back. By the riot's end, 23 people had been killed and more than five hundred…

Tags:
Item Type: Photograph
Date: 1919

Between 1916 and 1930, over a million African Americans living in the South migrated to cities in the North and West in what has become known as the "Great Migration." Many who were considering whether or not to leave the South sought information and assistance from the Chicago Defender, a black newspaper that vigorously advocated migration. In…

Item Type: Newspaper/Magazine
Date: 1917