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Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

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With the passage of the Jones-Shafroth Act in 1917, Puerto Ricans became citizens of the United States. At the same time, penetration of the island by American-backed sugar interests displaced thousands of rural inhabitants, pushing them into a wage…

Cuban Mutualista.png
Many immigrants joined mutual aid societies, which gave them a way to pool their financial resources to help members in times of crisis. Cuban immigrants in Tampa established El Bien Publico ("The Public Good") to provide medical services to their…

This essay explores the motivations of soldiers on both sides of the U.S. Civil War.

This essay explains the significance of young female immigrants in the labor upheavals that helped define the Progressive Era.

This essay re-introduces an often forgotten event—the Philippine-American War—and explains contemporary debates around the war and the ascencion of the United States to the ranks of colonial powers.

This essay explains how railroads transformed late-nineteenth century America and shows how their impact was felt differently across class and racial lines.

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This essay introduces you to the main forces behind the abolition of slavery in the United States, as well as the debate among historians as to who played the key role.

This essay introduces Manhattan's Five Points neighborhood and the people who lived there.

This short essay explains how historians came to focus not just on what slavery did to slaves, but what slaves did for themselves within the limits set by this brutal institution.

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This chart shows the numbers of Mexican immigrants entering the United States between 1900 and 1940, as counted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census.
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