Maps of Women's Suffrage Prior to the 19th Amendment

Although early suffragists were not successful in passing a federal constitutional amendment to give women the right to vote, activists worked hard at the local and state levels throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They formed local organizations, proposed new state laws, and campaigned for state-wide referenda that gave women the right to vote in some elections, often those relating to education (for example, school board elections). In 1869, the Wyoming territory granted women the right to vote in all elections, a right they kept when Wyoming was admitted as a state in 1890. Many other western territories and states did the same.


Source | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, 2010.
Creator | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Rights | Copyright American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Item Type | Map
Cite This document | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Maps of Women's Suffrage Prior to the 19th Amendment,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed November 23, 2014, http://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1693.