A Former Mill Girl Remembers the Lowell Strike of 1836 (with text supports)

Harriet Hanson Robinson began work in Lowell at the age of ten, later becoming an author and advocate of women's suffrage. In 1834 and 1836, the mill owners reduced wages, increased the pace of work, and raised the rent for the boardinghouses. The young female workers went on strike (they called it “turning out” then) to protest the decrease in wages and increase in rent. In 1898 Robinson published a memoir of her Lowell experiences where she describes the strike of 1836.


Source | Harriet Hanson Robinson, Loom and Spindle or Life Among the Early Mill Girls (New York, T. Y. Crowell, 1898), 83–86, from History Matters: The U.S. Survey on the Web, http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5714/.
Creator | Harriet Hanson Robinson
Item Type | Biography/Autobiography
Cite This document | Harriet Hanson Robinson, “A Former Mill Girl Remembers the Lowell Strike of 1836 (with text supports),” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed November 24, 2014, http://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1822.