The Brooklyn Consumers' League Takes on Sweatshops (short version, with text supports)

During the Progressive era, some women believed they could improve conditions for workers through their power as consumers—how they decided what products to buy, and from which stores. At both the local and national levels, women organized consumers' leagues to boycott (not buy from) businesses that didn’t treat its workers well or pay them enough. Consumers’ leagues also started programs that put labels on goods that were made with fair labor standards, so shoppers could buy from companies and stores that treated workers well. This newspaper article describes the work of the Brooklyn Consumers' League.


Source | "Consumers League Plans; The Sweat Shop to Be Considered at Public Meeting to Be Held April 10," Brooklyn Eagle 6 March 1901; from Brooklyn Daily Eagle Online (1841-1902), http://www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/eagle/
Creator | Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Item Type | Newspaper/Magazine
Cite This document | Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “The Brooklyn Consumers' League Takes on Sweatshops (short version, with text supports),” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed July 23, 2014, http://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1944.