Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

Table of Black and White Populations in Colonial New York

With a diverse population of Dutch, English, Welsh, Irish, Scots, Germans, French Huguenots, Portuguese Jews, and Africans, New York ranked as one of the three largest cities in colonial America, along with Boston and Philadelphia. During the British period (1664-1776), the white population grew steadily from both natural increase and immigration. Black population growth, however, depended almost entirely on slave imports from Africa and the Caribbean. In 1740 New York had the highest population density of slaves—second only to Charleston, South Carolina. Free blacks comprised a tiny fraction of the city's mostly enslaved black population.

Year

White

Black

Total

Blacks as a Percentage of Total

1698

4,237

700

4,937

14 %

1703

3,745

630

4,375

14 %

1723

5,886

1,362

7,248

19 %

1731

7,045

1,577

8,622

18 %

1737

6,947

1,719

8,666

20 %

1746

9,273

2,444

11,717

21 %

Source | Ira Berlin and Leslie Harris, eds., Slavery in New York (New-York Historical Society and The New Press, 2005), 63. Adapted by the American Social History Project.
Creator | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Item Type | Quantitative Data
Cite This document | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Table of Black and White Populations in Colonial New York,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed December 11, 2018, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1237.

Print and Share