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Occupational Shifts of Women in the Workforce by Race, 1910-1960

Between 1910 and 1960, the number of women working for wages in the United States grew from just over 8 million to over 23.2 million, rising from 21 percent to 32 percent of the workforce. The types of jobs that women of different races did also changed dramatically over that time period. These graphs do not include statistics for women who worked in farming, managerial, or professional jobs.


Source | Adapted by American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning from Martha J. Bailey and William J. Collins, "The Wage Gains of African-American Women in the 1940s," The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Sept. 2006), 751.
Creator | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Rights | Copyright American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Item Type | Quantitative Data
Cite This document | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Occupational Shifts of Women in the Workforce by Race, 1910-1960,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed March 25, 2019, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1238.

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