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The Declaration of Sentiments (short version with text supports)

In 1848 a group of 300 women and men, organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, met in Seneca Falls, New York to outline a list of demands for women’s equality. The Declaration of Sentiments, modeled on the U.S. Declaration of Independence, included a list of grievances directed at the male-led government. It was signed by sixty-eight women and thirty-two men, including Frederick Douglass. Women’s rights activists held annual conventions until the Civil War broke out in 1861.


Source | “Declaration of Sentiments,” 1848; in Elizabeth Cady Stanton, A History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 1 (Rochester, N.Y.: Fowler and Wells, 1889), pages 70-71.
Creator | Various
Item Type | Pamphlet/Petition
Cite This document | Various, “The Declaration of Sentiments (short version with text supports),” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed July 21, 2019, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1691.

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