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Graphs of Comparison of School Enrollment by Age, Gender, and Immigrant Group, 1910

The 1910 census counted how many children were enrolled in school (both public and parochial). Studies show that second generation American children (children of immigrants) were more likely to be enrolled in school than immigrant children. Whether immigrants came from urban or rural societies also mattered; peasants from rural societies (like Italy or Poland) were less likely to enroll their children in schools once they arrived in the United States. This chart combines foreign-born and children of foreign-born parents for each immigrant group. Because some lines overlap and are hard to read, the percentage enrolled at each age for each ethnic group is also provided.


Source | Adapted from Susan Cotts Watkins, ed., After Ellis Island: Newcomers and Natives in the 1910 Census (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1994).
Creator | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Rights | Copyright American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Item Type | Quantitative Data
Cite This document | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Graphs of Comparison of School Enrollment by Age, Gender, and Immigrant Group, 1910,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed May 25, 2019, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1851.

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