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Charts of Immigrants' Connections in the United States, 1908-1909

Immigrants entering the United States told officials whether they were coming to join friends, relatives, or neither. If “neither”, it probably indicated that the person did not know anyone in the United States when he or she arrived. Friends and relatives helped new arrivals find housing and jobs. One study reported that 50% of immigrants found their first jobs through a friend or relative, compared to about 10% finding a first job through an advertisement or “help wanted” ad.


Source | Above: Adapted from Isaac Aaronovitch Hourwich, Immigration and Labor: The Economic Aspects of European Immigration to the United States (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1912), 94. Below: Adapted from Reports of the Immigration Commission: Emigration Conditions in Europe (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1911), 59.
Creator | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Rights | Copyright American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Item Type | Quantitative Data
Cite This document | American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Charts of Immigrants' Connections in the United States, 1908-1909,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed September 21, 2019, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1852.

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