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Examples of U.S. Laws Requiring Racial Segregation (short version, with text supports)

From the 1880s to the mid 1960s, many states passed laws requiring the segregation [separation] of white and "colored" [African American] people. (African Americans were also referred to as Negroes at that time.) These laws ruled nearly all aspects of people's everyday lives, including how they traveled, where they ate, where they went to school, where they sat in movie theaters, and whom they could marry. In 1964, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act, which banned such state and local laws. (These laws have been paraphrased to assist readers.)

EDUCATION


ENTERTAINMENT

TRANSPORTATION


MARRIAGE

Source | Remembering Jim Crow, http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/remembering/laws.html
Creator | American Social History Project
Rights | Copyright American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Item Type | Laws/Court Cases
Cite This document | American Social History Project, “Examples of U.S. Laws Requiring Racial Segregation (short version, with text supports),” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed July 21, 2019, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1890.

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