Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Historical Eras > Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945) (x)

We found 160 items that match your search

A Citizen Objects to New Deal Relief Programs (with text supports)

This letter was written to Harry Hopkins, the head of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. Between 1933 and 1935, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration gave the states $3.1 billion to distribute directly to the poor in the form of [...]

A Clergyman Expresses Concerns about the New Deal (with text supports)

In September 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sent a letter to clergymen across the United States, asking them whether conditions in their communities had improved since the start of the New Deal. This was one of over 100,000 responses he [...]

A WPA Worker is Ready to Fight (with text supports)

This letter was written to Harry Hopkins, who was then head of the Works Progress Administration. Between 1935 and 1943, when it was terminated, the W.P.A. was the nation's largest employer; in March 1936, W.P.A. rolls included over 3,400,000 [...]

City College Students Call for World War II Activism

Despite a significant surge in student anti-war activities during the early 1930s, the outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1936 caused many student organizations to rally against the rise of fascism in Europe. The aggression of Hitler and Mussolini [...]

Female Union Members Challenge Post-War Job Discrimination

When World War II ended, the large numbers of women who had taken industrial jobs during the war were forced out. Employers sought not only to give their jobs to returning veterans, but also to reassert the division of labor that had operated [...]

The CIO Promotes Anti-Discrimination Legislation during World War II

This billboard advertisement, dating from the early 1940s, suggests the common ground shared by the labor and civil rights movements. Created by the Congress of Industrial Organizations, the more progressive of the country's two main labor [...]

Off to War

Over one million black men and women served in the military during the second World War. Artist William Henry Johnson's images of the war often pictured soldiers in training camps, but this piece shows a family separating as a soldier departs for [...]

"Straighten Up - And Come Right Down to the March on Washington Movement"

This poster, from A. Philip Randolph's planned March on Washington in 1941, illustrates several issues central to the march. The threat of a large-scale public protest persuaded President Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802, which banned [...]

"Pvt. Joe Louis Says - We're Going to do our part"

Joe Louis, the famous heavyweight boxing champion, served in the Army from 1940 to 1942, appearing in exhibition matches as well as this recruitment poster. A few years earlier, Louis had defeated German heavyweight Max Schmeling, a symbol of the [...]

"Someone Talked"

One of the most famous posters of World War II, "Someone Talked" urges Americans to prevent sensitive information from falling into enemy hands. Closely associated with the "Loose Lips Sink Ships" series communicating the same idea, the image of a [...]

Narrow search by