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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Historical Eras > Industrialization and Expansion (1877-1913) (x)

We found 266 items that match your search

African Americans Protest U.S. Imperialism

In 1899, with a presidential election coming up, a group of black Bostonians gathered to express their opinions about the U.S. occupation of the Philippines. While whites led most anti-imperialist organizations, many farmers, labor unions, [...]

William Jennings Bryan Speaks Out Against Imperialism

Initially supportive of U.S. expansion in the Philippines, Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan soon made anti-imperialism a standard plank in his stump speeches during the 1900 campaign.

The United States Bars Chinese Immigrants

The Chinese Exclusion Act, passed on May 6, 1882, was the first major restriction placed on immigration in the U.S., and the only immigration law that explicitly barred a specific group from entering the country. The Exclusion Act forbade Chinese [...]

Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904 Viewer's Guide

This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary, as well as [...]

1877: The Grand Army of Starvation Viewer's Guide

This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary 1877: The Grand Army of Starvation. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary as well as additional [...]

Planning Philippine-American War Cartoons worksheet

This worksheet helps students plan political cartoons for the activity "Creating a Cartoon for the Philippine-American War."

A Country within a Country: Understanding San Francisco's Chinatown

In this activity, students use a range of primary and secondary sources about San Francisco's Chinatown (1880s-1920) to explore what the community meant to residents and to outsiders.

Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden"

In this activity students analyze Kipling's famous poem about imperialism and read several poems that were written in response to it. Students discuss how effective the poems are as art, political commentary, and historical evidence.

Poetry Analysis for "The White Man's Burden" worksheet

This worksheet goes with the activity "Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden." It helps students analyze several poems and secondary stories to understand a range of responses to U.S. imperialism at the turn of the [...]

A Reformer Praises the Carlisle School

Richard Pratt, an officer of the United States Cavalry, became obsessed with the assimilation of Indians into U.S. "civilization." Pratt believed that Indians could only survive if they adapted the values of the white man; it was necessary to "kill [...]

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