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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Historical Eras > Industrialization and Expansion (1877-1913) (x)

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An African-American Newspaper Defends the Shirtwaist Strikebreakers

The New York Age was an African-American newspaper founded by Timothy Thomas Fortune, a civil rights leader and journalist. This excerpt from an editorial on the 1909 New York City shirtwaist maker's strike defends the paper's decision to run [...]

The Wall Street Journal Argues for Immigration "Distribution, Not Prevention"

This Wall St. Journal article acknowledges some of the problems that accompanied early-twentieth-century immigration—urban overcrowding, the strain on local resources, threats posed by foreign anarchists—but argues that immigrants should [...]

Jewish Immigrants Arrive in the Land of Liberty

This magazine cover, published by the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, shows Lady Liberty holding a key in one hand and opening a gate to waiting Jewish immigrants with the other. The biblical verses flanking the gate read, on the right, "Open the [...]

The New York Times Describes a Captive's Experience with U.S. Army Deserter

This article reports Lieutenant F.W. Alstaetter's interactions with David Fagin while held captive. David Fagin, an African-American soldier who had deserted from the 24th Infantry, joined the Filipino resistance, rising to the rank of General, [...]

The New York Times Reports Battles against Filipino Insurgents

This article provides details of battles between the U.S. Army and the Filipino "insurgents." Many of the reports describe the Filipino soldiers being led by non-Filipino commanders, including David Fagin, an African-American deserter of the U.S. [...]

Chinese Women Relax in Golden Gate Park

These women relaxing in Golden Gate Park in the 1890s wear silk robes and embroidered slippers; their clothing indicates that it is some sort of holiday or special occasion. The ratio of men to women in Chinatown was 20-to-1; merchants' wives had [...]

A Chinese Laborer Shields His Face from the Camera

The majority of Chinatown's residents were male laborers who worked in jobs like constructing railroads, mining, and agriculture. Many workers left their families in China, planning to return after they had made enough money. The rise of [...]

"Climbing Into America"

Lewis Hine snapped this photograph of immigrants "climbing into America" after arriving at Ellis Island in 1908. At this time most of the immigrants arriving in New York came from Eastern and Southern Europe, a fact suggested by these arrivals' [...]

Pupils Study in San Francisco's Chinatown

This photograph shows a schoolroom scene from San Francisco's Chinese Public School, circa late nineteenth or early twentieth century. The Chinese immigrant students are taught by a middle-class white woman. Note the students' traditional dress and [...]

"The Chinese 6 Companies at 843 Stockton St. Known by the Chinese as the Chung Wa Woey Koon"

This photograph shows the headquarters of the so-called Chinese Six Companies, officially known as the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, on Stockton Street in San Francisco. The Six Companies, organized in the 1850s and formally [...]

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