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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Historical Eras > Revolution and New Nation (1751-1815) (x)

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Liberty for All Petition worksheet

Students use this worksheet with the Liberty for All activity to write from one of three points of view about liberty and the American Revolution.

Tea Party Etiquette Viewer's Guide

This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary Tea Party Etiquette. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary as well as additional primary source [...]

Understanding the Preamble Assessment

This assessment gauges whether students have understood key ideas about and in the Preamble to the United States Constitution. It is part of the activity "The Evolution of the Preamble."

Analysis Worksheet: The Preamble

This worksheet helps students analyze the Preamble to the United States Constitution. It includes vocabulary and other supports for low-level readers. It is used in the activity "The Evolution of the Preamble."

Chart of Rights and Population in Revolutionary America

The 1770s and 1780s were a period of uneven social change in America. The first table shows the extent to which various groups in society could vote, serve on juries and own property through the 1780s. The second table shows a breakdown of the U.S. [...]

Claiming "We the People" worksheets

These worksheets help students analyze sets of primary sources for the activity "Claiming 'We the People': Political Participation in Revolutionary America."

Virginians Petition to Prevent the Emancipation of Slaves (with text supports)

The spirit of the American Revolution inspired some slaveholders to manumit, or free, their slaves. In 1782, Virginia passed a law that allowed slaveholders to set slaves free in their wills, where before manumission required a special act of the [...]

John Adams Explains Why Women Should Not Be Able to Vote (with text supports)

James Sullivan, a state court judge in Massachusetts and colleague of John Adams, was often sympathetic to those who thought women and non-elite men should have a voice in the new nation’s government. Adams disagreed, explaining to Sullivan why [...]

John Adams Explains Why Men Without Property Should Not Be Able to Vote (with text supports)

James Sullivan, a state court judge in Massachusetts and colleague of John Adams, was often sympathetic to those who thought women and non-elite men should have a voice in the new nation’s government. Adams disagreed, explaining to Sullivan why [...]

Colonial Crowds Protest the Stamp Act (short version with text supports)

The British parliament passed the Stamp Act in 1765. The act required that colonists buy a stamp from the government for most printed items, such as newspapers, contracts, books, playing cards, and court documents. Popular protests against the new [...]