Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Theme > Immigration and Migration (x)

We found 202 items that match your search

"The Story of Sadie Frowne, A Brooklyn Sweatshop Girl"

Sadie Frowne's story is in many ways typical of the immigrant worker in New York's Lower East Side.  Her story was originally published the New York Independent, a reform-minded newspaper, and later collected into the 1906 book The Lives of [...]

A Chinese Immigrant Tells of Labor in a New Land

Since their arrival in the United States in the 1850s, Chinese immigrants confronted social, political, and economic discrimination. Many Americans believed that the Chinese posed a threat to white workers and should not be eligible for citizenship. [...]

The Wall Street Journal Argues for Immigration "Distribution, Not Prevention"

This Wall St. Journal article acknowledges some of the problems that accompanied early-twentieth-century immigration—urban overcrowding, the strain on local resources, threats posed by foreign anarchists—but argues that immigrants should [...]

Jewish Immigrants Arrive in the Land of Liberty

This magazine cover, published by the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, shows Lady Liberty holding a key in one hand and opening a gate to waiting Jewish immigrants with the other. The biblical verses flanking the gate read, on the right, "Open the [...]

"Borders, Open and Closed"

In this audio slideshow, New York Times reporter Nina Bernstein discusses shifts in Mexican immigration from the 1920s through the bracero program of the 1940s and 1960s.

Item Type: Website
"Climbing Into America"

Lewis Hine snapped this photograph of immigrants "climbing into America" after arriving at Ellis Island in 1908. At this time most of the immigrants arriving in New York came from Eastern and Southern Europe, a fact suggested by these arrivals' [...]

Chinese Servants Hold Trays and Flowers

Many Chinese immigrants in the nineteenth century, the majority of whom were men, took their first jobs as domestic servants for white families in the West. They were responsible for cooking, cleaning, laundry, and sometimes childcare. One reason [...]

Item Type: Photograph
"Lodgers in a crowded Bayard Street tenement"

Lodgers in a boarding room on New York's Bayard Street charging "five cents a spot" exemplify the overcrowded, frequently squalid living conditions that immigrants in New York City faced at the turn of the twentieth century. As documented in Jacob [...]

A Group of "Boat People" Arrive by Plane

This photograph from the Detroit News, December 16, 1978, shows a Vietnamese family arriving in the United States. In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, thousands of refugees fled Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos in search of new lives in the United [...]

A Know-Nothing Compares "Romanism" with "Republicanism"

In the mid-nineteenth century, the arrival of large numbers of Catholics from Ireland and Germany made the new immigrants' faith and its place in American society a hot-button issue. Such ideas found their expression in the anti-Catholic polemics of [...]

Narrow search by