Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Tag > Chinese Immigration (x)

We found 77 items that match your search

Customers Shop in a Chinatown General Store

The Sam Hop Company, a general store on Clay Street in San Francisco, sold a wide assortment of Chinese imported goods. Merchants were the economic and political leaders of Chinatown. They worked with American contractors to bring workers from China [...]

"Interior of Chinese theatre, Jackson Street, San Francisco, Cal."

Going to the theater was a popular form of entertainment for Chinese immigrants. By the 1880s there were several different theater companies operating in Chinatown, including this theater, located on Jackson Street. Theaters could seat several [...]

"Boys Playing Shuttlecock"

Children were a visible part of San Francisco's Chinatown. Because of the tight-knit community, children moved freely within the neighborhood, often without direct supervision. In this Arnold Genthe photograph, four boys look on as a fifth boy [...]

"Chinese Restaurant, San Francisco, Cal."

Large restaurants, like the one pictured on this postcard, served a wide cross-section of the Chinese community. The top floors were typically reserved for the elites of the neighborhood. Middle floors housed the kitchen and offered a menu of dishes [...]

Item Type: Photograph
"The Fish Dealer's Daughter"

As historian John Kuo Wei Tchen notes of this portrait, "the girl's tattered clothing and gloves on both hands clearly indicate that she works hard, probably assisting her father in carrying the wicker shrimp baskets shown behind."  Tchen [...]

"Children of High Class"

Lew Kan, a prominent merchant who ran canneries and a store, walks through Chinatown with his two sons. The boys' formal clothing indicates their high status. All boys and many girls attended segregated public schools in Chinatown. (One merchant [...]

Exterior of a Chinese Temple in San Francisco

Chinese temples were often called Joss Houses. The word "joss" comes from the Portuguese term for God, Deus. Chinese immigrants in San Francisco went to temples to pray for good luck and to honor their ancestors. This photograph was most likely [...]

Item Type: Photograph
The AFL Supports Chinese Exclusion

These excerpts from a 1902 American Federation of Labor pamphlet argue for a second extension of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. The pamphlet, entitled Some Reasons for Chinese Exclusion: Meat vs. Rice, alleged that the supposed willingness of [...]

A Labor Leader Rails Against Chinese Immigration

In this "Workingmen's Address," published in 1878, Dennis Kearney of the Workingman's Party of California appeals to racist arguments against Chinese immigrants. After excoriating the fraud, corruption, and monopolization of land by the "moneyed [...]

A Chinese Immigrant Reacts to the Statue of Liberty

This letter, originally published in the New York Sun in 1885, was written by Saum Song Bo in response to a fund-raising campaign for the building of a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty. Three years earlier, Congress had passed the Chinese [...]