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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Tag > Uncle Sam (x)

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The White(?) Man's Burden

This cartoon, published in March of 1899 in Life magazine, depicts the figures of Uncle Sam, John Bull and Kaiser Wilhelm as three heavy burdens being borne on the backs of non-white people, who are stooped over under their weight.

The Stride of a Century

In 1876. the United States marked its centennial (or one hundredth birthday) with a World's Fair held in Philadelpha. The fair celebrated American technological progress and expansion. In this print, created by Currier & Ives, "Brother Jonathan" (a [...]

"The 'White Man's Burden': Uncle Sam to Kipling"

"Droch" was the pen name of Robert Bridges, a critic and editor at Scribner's and Life magazines and a friend to both Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt. In this response to Rudyard Kipling's "The White Man's Burden," he opens by sarcastically [...]

Uncle Sam Watches over Cuba and the Philippines

The Spanish-American War ended in December, 1898, when Spain surrendered to the U.S. and negotiated a peace treaty that sold Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines to the U.S. Cuba remained independent, but firmly under the influence of the United [...]

A Cartoonist's View of U.S. Imperialism

U.S. intervention in Puerto Rico and Cuba during the Spanish-American War established the U.S. as the dominant power in those countries, altering the paths of their respective independence movements. Critics accused the U.S. of acting in its own [...]

"The Americanese Wall, as Congressman Burnett Would Build It"

Beginning as early as 1897, members of Congress who wanted to limit immigration to the U.S. began proposing laws that would require immigrants to be literate. After repeated vetoes of such laws, the 1917 Immigration Act, sponsored by Congressman [...]

Uncle Sam Chases Pancho Villa

The turmoil that accompanied the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) sent many Mexicans to the United States looking for a better life. At times the violence of the Revolution crossed the border as well. After Pancho Villa raided the town of Columbus, [...]