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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Theme > Expansion and Imperialism (x)
  • Historical Eras > Industrialization and Expansion (1877-1913) (x)
  • Item Type > Newspaper/Magazine (x)

We found 11 items that match your search

A Filipino Independence Leader Denounces U.S. Intervention

Sixto Lopez (1863-1947) was a prominent and influential leader of the Filipino independence movement who worked closely with the American Anti-Imperialist League. In this article published in Gunton's Magazine (a pro-capitalist, pro-labor journal), [...]

Filipinos Object to "Reconcentration"

During its invasion of the Philippines, the United States ordered Filipinos to be concentrated or restricted in "protected" villages. Anyone not in a village would be considered an enemy insurgent. Although the war was officially declared over in [...]

The President of Union Pacific Praises the Railroads

This excerpt from Sidney Dillon's article "The West and the Railroads," from an 1891 issue of The North American Review, credits the railroad with the growth and positive transformation of the American West. The president of the Union Pacific [...]

The New York Times Reports Battles against Filipino Insurgents

This article provides details of battles between the U.S. Army and the Filipino "insurgents." Many of the reports describe the Filipino soldiers being led by non-Filipino commanders, including David Fagin, an African-American deserter of the U.S. [...]

A Filipino Representative Appeals to the American People

Galicano Apacible, a Filipino nationalist, wrote the following letter opposing U.S. annexation of the Philippines.  Apacible represented the Filipino Central Committee, a revolutionary group that supported independence from Spanish colonial [...]

A Soldier Reports on Filipino Perceptions of White and Black Americans

John W. Galloway, a member of the 24th Infantry stationed in the Philippines, reports his findings from discussions with Filipinos regarding the issue of race to an African-American newspaper at home. This letter highlights American concepts of [...]

A Soldier Reports on Filipino Grievances

This anonymous letter, to the Wisconsin Weekly Advocate by a black soldier, probably from the 24th or 25th infantry, denounces the behavior of Americans in the Philippines following its acquisition from the Spanish. He states that having seen the [...]

"Our America" (Excerpt)

Nuestra America/Our America, one of Martí's most important writings, first appeared in La Revista Ilustrada de Nueva York on Janurary 1, 1891, and on January 30 of that same year in El Partido Liberal of Mexico. Written as the Cuban [...]

A Filipino Representative Appeals to the American People (short version with text supports)

Galicano Apacible, a Filipino nationalist, wrote the following letter opposing U.S. annexation of the Philippines.  Apacible represented the Filipino Central Committee, a revolutionary group that supported independence from Spanish colonial [...]

African Americans Protest U.S. Imperialism

In 1899, with a presidential election coming up, a group of black Bostonians gathered to express their opinions about the U.S. occupation of the Philippines. While whites led most anti-imperialist organizations, many farmers, labor unions, [...]