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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Theme > Gender and Sexuality (x)
  • Historical Eras > Revolution and New Nation (1751-1815) (x)

We found 14 items that match your search

Abigail Adams Reminds John Adams to "Remember the ladies"

In this famous letter, Abigail Adams shares wartime news and opinions with her husband. Already planning for the war's successful conclusion, she admonishes him to consider the rights of women when developing laws for a newly independent nation.

A Boston Woman Describes Life on the Revolutionary Homefront

Wartime conditions thrust new responsibilities upon American women. With many husbands absent, women assumed heightened responsibilities for managing family finances and operating family farms and shops. The correspondence between Lucy Knox and her [...]

Abigail Adams Reminds John Adams to "Remember the Ladies" (with text supports)

In this famous letter, Abigail Adams, already planning for the war's successful conclusion, admonishes her husband John Adams to consider inequality between men and women when developing laws for a newly independent nation.

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During the colonial era, nearly all manufacturing was done in the home, often by highly-skilled women laborers. The production of textiles was the nearly exclusive province of women working in the home, who supervised the labor of men and boys, [...]

Am I Not A Woman And A Sister?

This illustration from an abolitionist book was a variation on the original 1787 seal of the British Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. The original organization symbol, showing a supplicant male slave, was designed by the famous British [...]

North Carolina Women Support a Non-importation Campaign

This declaration, reprinted in a London newspaper, provides an example of women's political activism during the revolutionary period. Over fifty "American ladies" from Edenton, North Carolina signed an agreement to stop buying and using tea, British [...]

"An American Woman" Lends her Support to the Revolutionary War

Esther Reed launched the creation of the Ladies' Association of Philadelphia with the publication of a broadside "Sentiments of an American Woman." Keenly aware of the limited scope of earlier women's efforts and referring to women as "brave [...]

A British Print Satirizes "A Society of Patriotic Ladies"

During the revolutionary era, cheap prints depicting current events were in demand in both England and the colonies. This 1775 British print presented a scene in Edenton, North Carolina, where fifty-one women had signed a declaration in support of [...]

Tags: Boycotts
Item Type: Cartoon
John Adams Explains Why Women Should Not Be Able to Vote

James Sullivan, a state court judge in Massachusetts and colleague of John Adams, was often sympathetic to those who thought women and non-elite men should have a voice in the new nation’s government. Adams disagreed, explaining to Sullivan [...]

Colonial Women Spin for Liberty

During the colonial period, colonists imported most of their manufactured goods. In 1767, the British government passed laws that required American colonists to pay taxes on imported goods from England. Many colonists responded by forming [...]