Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Theme > Work (x)
  • Tag > Reading Supports (x)

We found 20 items that match your search

A WPA Worker is Ready to Fight (with text supports)

This letter was written to Harry Hopkins, who was then head of the Works Progress Administration. Between 1935 and 1943, when it was terminated, the W.P.A. was the nation's largest employer; in March 1936, W.P.A. rolls included over 3,400,000 [...]

Workers Ask for the Continuation of the W.P.A. (with text supports)

In this letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt, Works Progress Administration workers in Michigan ask him to continue the program, claiming that it makes them feel more American. This version includes tax supports.

A Bracero Enters the United States (with text supports)

In this oral history Alvaro Hernandez describes how he entered the United States, first as an illegal worker and then as a bracero. Mr. Hernandez was born in Jilemes, Chihuahua, Mexico. His father was an agricultural worker and his mother was a [...]

An Apprentice's Indenture Contract (with text supports)

Many English settlers arrived in the colonies as indentured servants. Because poor men and women could not afford the cost of travel to North America, they bound themselves for four to seven years’ labor in return for passage across the [...]

Analysis Worksheet: "An Apprentice's Indenture Contract"

Use this worksheet as a scaffold to help students analyze a colonial-era "An Apprentice's Indenture Contract."

A White Californian Argues for Indian Indenture (with text supports)

White Californians complained that the new American government, which took over California after the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo in May 1848, was not doing enough to control and regulate Indian labor. In the chaos of the Mexican War, many Indian [...]

Active Viewing: Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl Vocabulary

These words and phases from the Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl documentary may be unfamiliar to students.

A Mill Girl Explains Why She Is Leaving Factory Life (with text supports)

Born on a Vermont farm, Sarah Rice left home at age 17 to make it on her own. Eventually she journeyed to Masonville, Connecticut to work in textile mills much like those of Lowell. Rice's first letter was written after she had been weaving in the [...]

Lessons in Looking: The Lowell Offering Worksheet

This worksheet helps students to analyze and interpret the meaning of an image that appeared on the cover of The Lowell Offering in 1845. The Lowell Offering was a monthly magazine written by the young women who worked in the Lowell textile mills [...]

A Mill Girl Tells Her Story of Work (with text supports)

Lucy Larcom worked in the mills of Lowell as a young woman. Forty years later, she described her experiences in her book An Idyl of Work. She dedicated the book "to working women."