Modern America (1914-1929)
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In this activity, students analyze documents to arrange events on a timeline of women's suffrage. The timeline and documents will help students understand the intersection of social movements and constitutional change. This activity can be modified by reducing the number of documents. An optional Smartboard Notebook file is included to facilitate…

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Item Type: Teaching Activity
Date: 2010

This worksheet helps students plan a character and takes notes on primary sources for the activity "Create a Migrant's Scrapbook from the First Great Migration."

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Item Type: Worksheet
Date: 2010

In this activity students examine documents from the period of the First Great Migration of African Americans to the North. As they look at the documents, they take notes to build a character of a migrant. Then they create a scrapbook that shows their characters' personal journeys and experiences during the Great Migration. This activity can be…

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Item Type: Teaching Activity
Date: 2010

This worksheet helps students prepare for a role play debate about what strategy African Americans should pursue towards full equality in the twentieth century. The instructions for this activity can be found in the activity "Debate: How Should African Americans Achieve Equality?"

Item Type: Worksheet
Date: 2010

In this activity students role play a debate among four African-American leaders at the turn of the century, about what strategy the black community should adopt to achieve full equality in the twentieth century. Students research their roles by reading and analyzing primary sources. This activity can work as a follow-up to viewing the film Up…

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Item Type: Teaching Activity
Date: 2010

African-American migrants to the North chose their destinations primarily based on their state of origin: those from Georgia and the Carolinas headed to cities along the eastern seaboard like New York and Philadelphia; migrants from Alabama and Mississippi headed for the Midwestern cities like Chicago; and those from Texas, Louisiana, and Tennessee…

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Item Type: Map
Date: 2008

In the years after World War I, Congress passed the Quota Act of 1921, followed by the Immigration Act of 1924, also known as the Johnson-Reed Act. The 1924 Act established a quota for the total number of immigrants allowed per annum at 165,000— less than 20 percent of the pre-World War I average— and based ceilings on the numbers of…

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Item Type: Quantitative Data
Date: 2008

This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary Up South: African-American Migration in the Era of the Great War. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary as well as additional primary source materials for use in the classroom.

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Item Type: Viewer's Guide
Date: 2007

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is commonly recognized as a leading writer of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1929). In "Hughes's Life and Career," Arnold Rampersad, professor of humanities at Stanford University, provides a biographical essay that illustrates the influences and experiences that marked Hughes's family background, education, writing and…

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Item Type: Hyperlink
Date: 1997

In 1917, ten-year-old Rubie Bond left Mississippi with her parents and migrated to Beloit, Wisconsin. Her father, who worked as a tenant farmer in the South, had been recruited to work at a factory in Beloit. In 1976, she was interviewed as part of an oral history project documenting the experiences of African-American migrants who moved to…

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Item Type: Oral History
Date: 1976