Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

Browse Items (59 total)

In this activity, students develop Common Core reading skills (eg. citing textual evidence, determining the central ideas, and determining meaning of words and phrases) through a study of the history of the second amendment to the U.S. Constitution…

This worksheet provides students with detailed task instructions and a note-taking guide for selecting evidence from their documents for the activity Supporting Claims with Evidence: The Second Amendment and Gun Control Debates.

This worksheet helps students understand what a preamble is and what it signifies when used in a law or constitution. It was designed to be used in as part of a close reading of the second amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Throughout U.S. history, governments at the local, state, and federal level have passed laws regulating the ownership and use of guns. This chart provides examples of such laws over time.

Restrictions on immigration, largely aimed at would-be migrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, gained considerable popular support during the 1920s. Anti-immigrant sentiment culminated in the Quota Act of 1921, which effectively reduced…

This short article by public health historians David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz reflects on the fortieth anniversary of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, passed in 1970. OSHA is one of the most important pieces of labor legislation ever…

This handout explains the process for passing amendments, as outlined in the Constitution, as well as the larger forces that push Congress and voters to support or oppose Constitutional change.

Following the Civil War and abolition of slavery, Republicans in Congress passed reconstruction laws meant to guarantee full citizenship and suffrage to African Americans. The 14th amendment required states to guarantee the rights of all citizens,…

Unfurling.png
After Congress approved the 19th Amendment in June 1919, the amendment had to be ratified by three fourths of the states. Fortunately, suffragists were well organized at the local level to pressure state legislatures into approving the amendment. To…

In this activity students will learn about how groups without political power—African Americans, women, and working-class men—sought to expand their political power in the Revolutionary era. Students will analyze primary sources to determine the…
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2