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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Historical Eras > Industrialization and Expansion (1877-1913) (x)
  • Item Type > Photograph (x)

We found 39 items that match your search

"Boys Playing Shuttlecock"

Children were a visible part of San Francisco's Chinatown. Because of the tight-knit community, children moved freely within the neighborhood, often without direct supervision. In this Arnold Genthe photograph, four boys look on as a fifth boy [...]

"The Fish Dealer's Daughter"

As historian John Kuo Wei Tchen notes of this portrait, "the girl's tattered clothing and gloves on both hands clearly indicate that she works hard, probably assisting her father in carrying the wicker shrimp baskets shown behind."  Tchen [...]

"Children of High Class"

Lew Kan, a prominent merchant who ran canneries and a store, walks through Chinatown with his two sons. The boys' formal clothing indicates their high status. All boys and many girls attended segregated public schools in Chinatown. (One merchant [...]

"Street of Gamblers (By Day)"

This photo of Ross Alley shows the preponderance of male immigrants in San Francisco's Chinatown. While outsiders dubbed this a "bachelor society," many Chinese immigrants had left behind families in China. Arnold Genthe's original caption for this [...]

"Chinese Butcher and Grocer Shop, Chinatown, S.F."

In the late 1880s, when this photograph was taken by Isaiah West Taber, there were over 20,000 Chinese living in California. Many settled in San Francisco's Chinatown, where markets, temples, theaters, and restaurants supplied a thriving commercial [...]

Filipino Nationalists Work Towards Independence

Spain ruled the Philippine islands for nearly four centuries before the U.S. invaded the country in 1899, but Filipinos never fully accepted Spanish domination. Uprisings against the Spanish came from all parts of the Filipino society, including [...]

Ten Thousand Women March for the Right to Vote

Suffrage activists staged a huge parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City on May 10, 1913. Over 10,000 women and men marched, and a crowd of over half a million lined the streets to watch. New Yorkers were inspired by women who had marched in protest [...]

"Members of Uncle Sam's Infant Class--Igorotte Filipinos, Igorotte Village, World's Fair, St. Louis, U.S.A., 1905"

Stereographic photographs were common souvenirs sold at the World’s Fairs. At the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, the Philippine village attracted hundreds of thousands of visitors. The U.S. government’s Bureau of Insular Affairs, which oversaw [...]

"Domestic Arts of the Bagobos Women, in the Philippine Village, St. Louis World's Fair, 1904"

The Philippine Village exhibition at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair included over one thousand Filipino men and women, many from indigenous tribes who were displayed in several “villages.” The Philippine Reservation promoters [...]

Chiricahua Apache Prisoners, Including Geronimo

The U.S. Army and the Apache tribe (who called themselves N’ne, meaning “the people”) engaged in armed conflict in the U.S. Southwest from 1851 through 1886. On September 4, 1886, the famed Apache leader Geronimo (or Goyahkla) surrendered to [...]