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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

  • Theme > Expansion and Imperialism (x)

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A Senator Speaks in Support of Empire (short version)

In this 1900 speech to Congress, the Republican Senator from Indiana, Albert J. Beveridge, strongly advocates the annexation of the Philippines. The term Malay refers to people from the Malay Peninsula, the Maylay Archipelago, and nearby islands in [...]

A Filipino Representative Appeals to the American People (short version with text supports)

Galicano Apacible, a Filipino nationalist, wrote the following letter opposing U.S. annexation of the Philippines.  Apacible represented the Filipino Central Committee, a revolutionary group that supported independence from Spanish colonial [...]

African Americans Protest U.S. Imperialism

In 1899, with a presidential election coming up, a group of black Bostonians gathered to express their opinions about the U.S. occupation of the Philippines. While whites led most anti-imperialist organizations, many farmers, labor unions, [...]

William Jennings Bryan Speaks Out Against Imperialism

Initially supportive of U.S. expansion in the Philippines, Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan soon made anti-imperialism a standard plank in his stump speeches during the 1900 campaign.

Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904 Viewer's Guide

This booklet is curriculum support for the American Social History Project's 30-minute documentary Savage Acts: Wars, Fairs, and Empire 1898-1904. The viewer's guide contains background information on issues raised by the documentary, as well as [...]

Planning Philippine-American War Cartoons worksheet

This worksheet helps students plan political cartoons for the activity "Creating a Cartoon for the Philippine-American War."

Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden"

In this activity students analyze Kipling's famous poem about imperialism and read several poems that were written in response to it. Students discuss how effective the poems are as art, political commentary, and historical evidence.

Poetry Analysis for "The White Man's Burden" worksheet

This worksheet goes with the activity "Art, Commentary and Evidence: Analysis of "The White Man's Burden." It helps students analyze several poems and secondary stories to understand a range of responses to U.S. imperialism at the turn of the [...]

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Preserves Mexicans' Rights in the Southwest

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican-American War in 1848, ceded 525,000 square miles--55% of--Mexican territory to the United States. In exchange, the United States paid approximately $15 million in damages to pay for [...]

White Leaders Predict the Disappearance of Mexicans and Native Americans in California

With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, the United States gained over half a million square miles of new lands in the Southwest. However, American settlers who traveled west to settle the land were not moving into unoccupied territory. [...]