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"The Story of Sadie Frowne" Analysis Worksheet

This worksheet helps students to determine the main ideas in The Story of Sadie Frowne, A Brooklyn Sweatshop Girl.

"Life in the Shop" Analysis Worksheet

This worksheet helps students to determine the central ideas and information in "Life in the Shop": The Story of an Immigrant Garment Worker.

Background Essay and Worksheet on Immigrant Working Women

This is a shortened, edited version of Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars (excerpt) used in The Pay Envelope: A Role Play activity. It helps students to determine the main ideas of the text by matching summary statements to the paragraphs in [...]

Progressive Era Activists Call for Trade Unions Language Analysis Worksheet

This worksheet helps students to identify and understand the meaning of "loaded language" in a statement from the Women's Trade Union League.

A Reformer Describes Child Labor in the Coal Mines

John Spargo's The Bitter Cry of Children, published in 1906, was among the most influential and widely read accounts of child labor written during the Progressive era. Spargo described work at the coal breaker, the area outside the mine where coal [...]

Jacob Riis Describes "The Street Arab"

In this excerpt from How the Other Half Lives, his famous 1890 book about urban poverty, Jacob Riis describes the army of young newsboys and bootblacks who worked and lived in Manhattan's streets. Later in the book, Riis praises the work of the [...]

A South Carolina Textile Mill Owner Explains Child Labor

In 1914 members of Congress were preparing to vote on the the Palmer-Owen Child Labor Bill, which would have banned interstate commerce in goods produced using the labor of children. Lewis Parker was the owner and manager of several textile mills, [...]

A Southern Cotton Mill Owner Justifies Child Labor

Daniel Augustus Tompkins was an owner and investor in numerous cotton mills in North Carolina. His beliefs reflected those of many mill owners, who argued in favor of child labor.

The Brooklyn Eagle Defends Some Kinds of Child Labor

In this 1902 editorial, the Brooklyn Eagle describes the conditions that require some children to work for wages to support their families.

"Colored Troops under General Wild, liberating slaves in North Carolina"

In this journalistic sketch, a group of African American soldiers liberates a plantation in eastern North Carolina. The troops were the so-called "African Brigade" composed of black recruits from Massachusetts and newly freed contraband slaves from [...]

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