Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

We found 1237 items that match your search

A Utah Resident Remembers Atomic Testing in 1950s Nevada

The arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union for nuclear weapons escalated quickly after World War II. After the Soviets detonated their first atomic weapon in 1949, the U.S. conducted a series of atomic tests in remote areas, [...]

Tags: Cold War
Item Type: Oral History
A Former Klansman Describes Why He Joined the Ku Klux Klan

In a 1977 interview, Edward McDaniel, a white southerner, relates his experience being inducted into the Ku Klux Klan some fifteen years earlier, during the height of the Civil Rights Movement. Looking back on his experiences, McDaniel expresses a [...]

Item Type: Oral History
An African American Tells Why She Followed Malcolm X

Ethel Minor offers her perspective on the black freedom struggle in this 1997 interview with Catherine Osborn. A follower of Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam, Minor found the integrationist aims of Martin Luther King, Jr. and his followers [...]

Tags: Malcolm X
Item Type: Oral History
A Vietnamese Refugee Tells Her Story

In the aftermath of the Vietnam War, thousands of so-called "boat people" fled Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, often in small overcrowded ships that were barely seaworthy. The story of Linda Thong, while horrific, is not unusual. Refugees often [...]

A Laotian Refugee Tells His Story

The small nation of Laos, along Vietnam's western border, became entangled in the Vietnam War. Laos was invaded by the North Vietnamese Army and covertly bombed by the U.S. After the Communist Pathet Lao emerged victorious in 1975, the country [...]

A Sharecropper Explains Why He Joined the Exodusters

John Solomon Lewis of Leavenworth, Kansas, wrote this letter on June 10, 1879. Lewis and his family were among thousands of African Americans known as "Exodusters" who escaped the harsh economic and racial realties of the Reconstruction South. The [...]

Bayard Rustin Reflects on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

In this oral history Bayard Rustin offers his opinion about why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, held on August 28, 1963, was a success. Rustin was an organizer of the march along with many others, including A. Philip Randolph, an [...]

African-American Victims Describe the New York City Draft Riots

On July 20, four days after federal troops put down the 1863 Draft Riot, a group of Wall Street businessmen formed a committee to aid New York's devastated black community. The Committee of Merchants for the Relief of Colored People Suffering from [...]

A Chinese American Describes Going to School in Chinatown

San Francisco's first public school for Chinese immigrants, known first as the Chinese School and then as the Oriental School, began operating in 1859. The school intended to segregate Chinese children from white children in the city's public [...]

A Migrant Worker Describes the Hard Work in the Northwest

The following is an excerpt of an interview with Guadalupe Gamboa conducted by the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies. Gamboa describes the difficult life of migrant farmworkers on the west coast that kept workers isolated and made it difficult [...]

Item Type: Oral History

Narrow search by