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menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

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Former Slaves Remember Resistance

While the harsh punishments meted out under slavery meant instances of open resistance were rare, many slaves nonetheless defied their masters in day-to-day life. The following excerpts are from interviews with former slaves, conducted as part of [...]

Item Type: Oral History
A War Worker Finds New Independence on the Job

When Los Angeles resident Beatrice Morales Clifton went to work at the Lockheed Aircraft plant in Burbank, California, she was a married mother of four children. In this excerpt from a longer interview, Morales Clifton, the daughter of Mexican [...]

A Volunteer Medic Describes Combat in Vietnam

Wayne Smith grew up in Providence, Rhode Island. He was the second of eleven children and the oldest son. When he was ten years old, his father died in a fire in their home, and the family had to move into public housing. Smith served in Vietnam as [...]

Item Type: Oral History
A Midwestern Runaway Remembers the CCC

During the Great Depression, many young people left home to search for economic opportunity (and sometimes adventure) on the open roads of America. Jim Mitchell was a sophomore in high school when his father lost his job, sending the family into [...]

A Midwestern Runaway Remembers the CCC (with text supports)

Jim Mitchell, who joined the CCC in 1933, recalls how joining the program gave him a sense of purpose and pride, as well as skills. This document includes text supports, including definitions.

Black Hawk Remembers Village Life Along the Mississippi

Black Hawk was a Sauk Indian who lived in a village at the junction of the Rock and Mississippi Rivers in Illinois. After the Louisiana Purchase, Sauk and other tribal leaders signed a treaty that ceded Indian lands east of the Mississippi River to [...]

Item Type: Oral History
A Songwriter Recalls the Origins and Impact of an Antiwar Anthem

After serving in the Navy, Joe McDonald moved to Berkeley, California, as the anti-Vietnam War movement was beginning to pick up momentum. He recorded "I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-to-Die-Rag" under the name "Country Joe and the Fish"; the song gradually [...]

New York

In this painting, George Bellows, a member of the "Ashcan School" of early twentieth-century American artists, depicts the hustle-and-bustle of Union Square, already surrounded by skyscrapers and billboards. The members of the Ashcan School were [...]

Portrait of Abigail Smith Babcock (Mrs. Adam Babcock)

Born in Boston in 1738, John Singleton Copley became America's first major portrait artist. He painted numerous people in both the colonies and London, including the notable patriots John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and John Adams. The subject of this [...]

Item Type: Painting
Anne Green (circa 1720-1775)

Anne Green, one of a small number of women in the colonial printing trade, became publisher of the Maryland Gazette after the death of her husband in 1767. She was later appointed the official printer of documents for the colony of Maryland. This [...]

Item Type: Painting

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