Herb - social history for every classroom

Search

Herb - social history for every classroom

menuAmerican Social History Project  ·    Center for Media and Learning

We found 1237 items that match your search

A Black Migrant Crosses the Mason-Dixon Line

In this memoir first published in 1952, Charles Denby, an African-American migrant from Alabama, recalls his train ride North and first night in Detroit, Michigan. In 1930, out of work because of the Great Depression, Denby moved back to the South. [...]

A Senator Speaks in Support of Empire (short version)

In this 1900 speech to Congress, the Republican Senator from Indiana, Albert J. Beveridge, strongly advocates the annexation of the Philippines. The term Malay refers to people from the Malay Peninsula, the Maylay Archipelago, and nearby islands in [...]

A Filipino Representative Appeals to the American People (short version with text supports)

Galicano Apacible, a Filipino nationalist, wrote the following letter opposing U.S. annexation of the Philippines.  Apacible represented the Filipino Central Committee, a revolutionary group that supported independence from Spanish colonial [...]

African Americans Protest U.S. Imperialism

In 1899, with a presidential election coming up, a group of black Bostonians gathered to express their opinions about the U.S. occupation of the Philippines. While whites led most anti-imperialist organizations, many farmers, labor unions, [...]

William Jennings Bryan Speaks Out Against Imperialism

Initially supportive of U.S. expansion in the Philippines, Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan soon made anti-imperialism a standard plank in his stump speeches during the 1900 campaign.

A Union Army General Describes the Impact of Contraband Slaves (with text supports)

In the testimony that follows, a general tells Congress how contraband slaves served his army and had a dramatic impact on the way Union soldiers thought about slavery and freedom.

Selling Sweet Potatoes in Charleston

Slaves commonly sold produce like sweet potatoes or peanuts and other goods on the streets of Charleston. Slave owners coordinated this “slave-hiring system” to help raise additional income for the plantation. Mary Reynolds, a former [...]

Item Type: Poster/Print
"The Voting-Place"

During the 1840s and 1850s, anti-immigrant feelings grew among many native-born whites. Nativists argued that immigrants caused many of the nation’s ills by rejecting “American” work habits, culture, and religion. Nativists and and their [...]

"The Irrepressible Conflict"

In this cartoon from the weekly satirical magazine Vanity Fair, an Irish longshoreman tells a black worker seeking employment on New York's waterfront: "Well, ye may be and man and a brother, sure enough; but it's little hospitality ye'll get out of [...]

Table of Naming Practices among the Bennehan-Cameron Plantation Slaves, Orange County, North Carolina, 1778–1842

This table records the names of enslaved children and their parents on a North Carolina plantation over 65 years. Enslaved Africans and African-American slaves on this plantation purposefully established naming practices to link slave families and [...]

Narrow search by